Wednesday, February 28, 2018

Watson BROWN #WarriorWednesday


Watson BROWN
Choctaw Freedman #1205
Land Allotment Enrollment #3910

Historic Capitol Tushka-homa Choctaw Nation  Copyright 2018 Terry LIGON
Living in the shadow of the Choctaw Council House a freedmen leader emerged that challenged the system of oppression within the nation regarding the former slaves that lived among the Choctaw Indians.

Watson BROWN at the time of his application for a land allotment as a Choctaw Freedman was the tender age of seventy years.
Initially, the BROWN family was placed on the Chickasaw Freedmen roll but was transferred based on who was his last slave owner; James BROWN. Like so many of the freedmen records there is little information documented in the Dawes interview packet that reveals the name of Watson’s parents. Whether he provided that information to the commissioners we don’t know, hopefully that information will be discovered by descendants of Watson BROWN.
Choctaw Freedman Dawes Card #1205 front Watson BROWN
Choctaw Freedman Dawes Card #1205 rear Watson  BROWN
Choctaw Freedman Interview Packet (M1301) p2 Watson BROWN
Senate Executive Document 82  40th Congress, 2nd Session p4

Approximately thirty years earlier Watson BROWN was a member of the Choctaw-Chickasaw Council that consisted of thirty-six individuals. The council sent four members of their organization to Washington, D.C. with a petition to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. The representatives were instructed by the association to “present the views set forth in our petition of this date (1869) and respectfully urge the government to take early action in all matters affecting our interest.”

What the former slaves of the Chickasaw and Choctaw Indians did was not an easy decision for them and it was not a decision that did not have possible consequences to them and their families. Their actions were one of the earliest forms of political protest in Indian Territory by former slaves and it was a determined act to receive “equal justice” for them as an emancipated people.


The story of the Choctaw and Chickasaw Freedmen is an incredible American story that has gone largely unnoticed. We should all be proud of the men and women who stood firm in their determination to be recognized in the only nation they knew!


ADDITIONAL RECORDS CONNECTED TO WATSON BROWN


Chickasaw Freedman Card #1096 BROWN, Winnie
                Living in Sans Bois, Indian Territory, Choctaw Nation
                Father: Watson BROWN        Mother: Silvia BROWN (d)
                Daughter HARRIS, Martha may not have been enumerated on Dawes Roll
Chickasaw Freedman Card #1073 REED, Timba
                Living in Hartshorne, Indian Territory, Choctaw Nation
                Father: deceased            Mother: Amy (enslaved by John REED)
                Timba was deceased as of December 12, 1902 and application was cancelled
Senate Executive Document 82; 40th Congress, 2nd Session July 23, 1868

 SURNAMES APPEARING IN THIS ARTICLE

BROWN
REED
WOLF

PLACE NAMES APPEARING IN THIS ARTICLE

HARTSHORNE, CHOCTAW NATION, INDIAN TERRITORY
SANS BOIS, CHOCTAW NATION, INDIAN TERRITORY
TUSKAHOMA, CHOCTAW NATION